International Feel Third Anniversary

Uruguayan label International Feel has been consistently providing the world with great, Balearic-influenced music since their very first release, Rocha's debut track, 'Hands Of Love.' The music released since has been supremely considered, including new original material from DJ Harvey and Gatto Fritto, amongst others. It has also been refreshing to see a label put as much care and attention into the artwork and all other aspects of each release. LN-CC has worked with International Feel on numerous exclusive projects in the past, and so it seemed only natural to get together once more to celebrate their 3rd anniversary.

In celebration we have produced an exclusive, strictly limited CD set complete with hand-numbered posters, as well as a commemorative t-shirt.

Each CD comes with one of six posters, each in an edition of six and featuring artwork taken from a number of International Feel's most celebrated releases. A logo poster and anniversary artwork edition also feature. The prints are hand numbered and printed on high quality etching paper, whilst the CD itself is an exclusive mix of International Feel tracks by Balearic Mike.

The t-shirt has been produced exclusively for the anniversary and, outside of Japan, is available only at LN-CC.



International Feel and LN-CC

Below is a look back at some of the special projects that LN-CC have worked on with International Feel in the past, including limited pressings of original material from the likes of DJ Harvey and exclusive, hand-printed artwork.


International Feel Influences

To celebrate the third anniversary of International Feel and the forthcoming launch of the exclusive anniversary t-shirt and poster print set, we asked label boss Mark Barrott to pick a selection of records that have influenced his approach to both making music and running the label.


Steve Reich - Music for 18 Musicians - 1976

Steve Reich - Music for 18 Musicians - 1976

I think if you had to pick just one record that is an absolute influence for me it would be Steve Reich's Music For 18 Musicians. It basically transports you to another universe every time you listen to it - you think, how the fuck did someone not only conceive of that, but how the fuck did someone score that on a musical stave, from their brain? And then, how do you play that as a musician? For me, even before you had Kraftwerk, you had Steve Reich, and Teddy Riley and all those sort of guys.

Another thing is that Reich will openly admit that a lot of his polyrhythms come from African drumming. Before he started all of that minimalist sound, before he did Drumming (1971), he went to Ghana where a lot of that comes from.

You could argue that dance music comes from Ghanaian, West African and Central African rhythms and then from to the minimalism of Steve Reich, as you have elements of trance, even acid really. Then you're into Kraftwerk and eventually end up with the early techno of Juan Atkins and Derrick May.


Kraftwerk - The Man-Machine - 1978

Kraftwerk - The Man-Machine - 1978

A Kraftwerk album, but which Kraftwerk album? The Man-Machine, I think. Maybe I got this in the early eighties, when it had already been out for 3-4 years. I just remember playing it on my parents' old music system, putting on the headphones and drifting away. This was before [I had discovered] Steve Reich even. I would put on The Man-Machine, and with tracks like 'Neon Lights' I would just trip out to them because of the soundscapes that had been created and how beautiful it was. I always remember someone saying to me that they'd once seen Ralf Hutter sit down at a piano in a friend's house [...] just watching him play, the melodies he came up with were just unbelievable. Its a similar thing to what I would take later from Aphex Twin and Boards Of Canada, this sense of melody.


Sky - S/T - 1979

Sky - S/T - 1979

I have to say that one of my earliest influences was the band Sky, who I went to see live with my mum when I was very young. She took me to see them because she liked John Williams, the guitarist. I remember seeing too Frances Monkman, whose library music I listened to a lot later on, and that kind of influenced the IFEEL Studio project. I remember sitting there and reading the programme - this must have been about '78 I guess - and at the back there was an advert for a Prophet 5 polyphonic synthesiser. I thought, I want that! I actually rang the shop the next day and was told it was, I think, 2500. In 1978! But yes, that first Sky album, I don't know if you know a track called Westway? Just a great, great album.


Steely Dan - Gaucho - 1980

Steely Dan - Gaucho - 1980

I'll tell you another album that I really love and that's Gaucho by Steely Dan. I remember when I first started smoking weed, listening to that album under a red lightbulb in my bedroom and thinking I was black and cool! I mean, I was still white and not very cool but nevermind...


League Unlimited Orchestra - Love And Dancing - 1982

League Unlimited Orchestra - Love And Dancing - 1982

I would say Dare (1981, The Human League), but I'm going to go with the League Unlimited Orchestra version. Dare is just an incredible, timeless synthesiser pop album, but I guess to be a little more trendy we can pick the League Unlimited dubbed out version of it! If I ever DJ these days, you could still play the entire album, whether its 'Love Action' or 'Things That Dreams Are Made Of.' It still blows people's minds.


Duran Duran - Rio - 1982

Duran Duran - Rio - 1982

Let's not forget Rio by Duran Duran. I'm an absolute Nick Rhodes aficionado, you know. I think he's one of the most underrated synthesists in the history of the world ever! I'm a big, big Nick Rhodes fan and yes, I'm a big, big fan of Rio by Duran Duran.


New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies - 1983

New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies - 1983

There's got to be a New Order album in there, but which one? Let's say, Power, Corruption and Lies. [Being from Sheffield and having] Human League, Cabaret Voltaire... well just across the Pennines you had New Order. I was a bit too young for Joy Division - I think I was still listening to Bay City Rollers then! I think that New Order just had something. There's a reason people always cite them as a massive influence and that's because they are.


Eurhythmics - Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This) - 1983

Eurhythmics - Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This) - 1983

I know a lot of people pick up on some of their more obscure stuff as being Balearic [...] I think that this album was made in a warehouse on an 8 track tape recorder and an MXR drum computer. Everybody knows it for [the title track] 'Sweet Dreams', which I actually think is one of the shittest songs on the album. But its got one of my all time favourite songs, which is 'A City Never Sleeps.' I just think that song says everything that a song should ever say, in terms of vibe, atmosphere, mood, everything.


Kate Bush - Hounds Of Love - 1985

Kate Bush - Hounds Of Love - 1985

Now this is a fantastic album, i guess in a similar way to the Sigur Ros album [Takk]. I just think she is beyond genius, the way she constructs songs and constructs soundscapes. I think that Hounds of Love is her best album. I just listen to that album continually.


Prince - Sign O' The Times - 1987

Prince - Sign O' The Times - 1987

Prince's Sign O' The Times was a big influence as well, I don't know why really. It wasn't so much a direct influence, like, 'oh I've got the funk and its from Prince!' kind of thing. Its just a great album, in a way that is so disparate and so different [yet] so well constructed and put together.


Baby Ford - Ford Trax - 1988

Baby Ford - Ford Trax - 1988

I don't know if you'd call this an album, but do you remember Baby Ford's Ford Trax? You know, some people grew up listening to 'Strings Of Life,' and I never heard that at the time - I mean, I probably did in a club but never recognised it. For me it was all about Baby Ford and [his tracks] 'Oochie Koochie,' 'Crashing'... all of that stuff. I would say that if I had to choose something like that from the acid period it would have to be 'Ford Trax.'


Ultramarine - Every man and woman is a star - 1991

An album I really love, that I don't know if you guys will be familiar with, is the Ultramarine album, Every Man and Woman Is A Star, from about fifteen years ago. It's such a great record, they were sort of like an electronic folk band and this was their first album. There's one really fucking great track on it, the opening track called 'Discovery,' where they kind of blend hillbilly moonshine vibes with a 303 and a violin! Following on from [the music I got into after] the whole Graeme Park at the Leadmill (in Sheffield) experience, it was a real turning point for me. I started to get into more chilled out stuff, and this is just a really great, atmospheric album.


Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92 - 1992

Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92 - 1992

Black Dog's Bytes (1993) was a big album for me, one of the earliest ambient techno albums on Warp Records, but I think if I'm gonna pick an ambient techno album it would have to be Selected Ambient Works 85-92 by Aphex Twin. I've been listening again to that and its just a really great, timeless album. People always talk about Aphex Twin as having amazing production skills, but i think the thing that people maybe miss is his actual songwriting. What makes it so strong is the actual sense of melody and counterpoint.


Boards Of Canada - Music Has The Right To Children - 1998

Boards Of Canada - Music Has The Right To Children - 1998

In a similar sort of headspace to the Aphex Twin record, I'd also have to pick Music Has A Right To Children by Boards Of Canada. I've actually got this idea to make Boards Of Canada-style house music, with that kind of wonky nostalgia. I'll probably do it for about twenty minutes, realise it doesn't work and throw it in the bin though! It's just an incredible album, nobody had really done that wonky, nostalgic, Seventies, school film kind of vibe before. I know now everybody's copied it but I still think it's fantastic.


Lambchop - Is A Woman - 2002

Lambchop - Is A Woman - 2002

This for me is a really big album. Its beauty and silence and sense of space is really fantastic. I guess there might not seem to be a common thread in all of these choices but, you know, I'm a Balearic record label so I can get away with choosing the most bizarre things in the world!


Sigur Ros - Takk - 2005

Sigur Ros - Takk - 2005

I think this is just an absolutely stunning album. I don't know if people expect me to pick 'e2 to e4' (1984 solo album by Ash Ra Tempel guitarist Gottsching), or some obscure new age album from the Seventies instead of things like this, but my musical tastes as a listener, or as a set of influences, are very different from perhaps, 'this great house track' or 'that great disco tune.' It's more stuff like Steve Reich, more esoteric stuff and I think Sigur Ros' Takk is just fucking mindblowing. Again, its almost like, how do they make that? How do they create those soundscapes, and that glitchy ambient beauty?


Quiet Village - Silent Movie - 2008

Quiet Village - Silent Movie - 2008

Finally, we've got a Balearic album that was a really big influence on starting the label. You know, people might think that it was listening to [DJ] Harvey, but one of the things that really struck a chord with me was Quiet Village's 'Silent Movie.'

Basically, I remember it was the album that I first listened to after arriving in Uruguay, in February three and a half years ago. It was kind of late in the summer but still very hot, but quiet in terms of the tourist vibe. I remember just driving around getting to know the area, driving along up towards the Brazilian border and just being absolutely... I don't know how to say it. Like, the first track just says to me Punta Del Este, the place that I started International Feel. So of all the things I've talked about, I think the most direct influence on the label was this album.


International Feel Selected Artwork

International Feel's mission from day one was to create items of timeless beauty in a binary world. To make a statement against all the zero's and one's and to bring back a much under-rated sense.....tactility. That's why I hired Phantom as art director and gave him carte blanche to create the label's visual identity. His attention to detail and 'eye' are as important to the label as it's 180g vinyl and the music itself - the two are inseparable, as the music and art go hand in hand to create the feel, desirability and quality I want the label to be known for, both now and in 10...20....30 years time.